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Interview with Louise Westra

Welcome my darling Pretties to our Beyond to the Dawn of Business podcast for pretty empowered female entrepreneurs.

It’s time to step into your power Pretties! Lift each other, support the squad and choose a life filled with the autonomy and freedom to live your dreams.

I’m your host Dawn Beth, the Owner and Founder of Beyond the Dawn digital business brand and agency. My coffee is hot and my eyelashes are on, so we are ready to go!

 

I want all female entrepreneurs to feel empowered, supported and loved, and given the opportunity to really connect with other female powerhouses in the industry, in a way in which we lift each other up and inspire each other, and take care of each other in ways that we have previously not seen in business, possibly, listen to us waffling on about business and life our families, and our mindset, our financial goals and our freedoms and our autonomy. And what we hope for the world and what we hope for you, what we hope for ourselves, and all of the things that we’ve experienced through this very colorful journey of becoming successful female entrepreneurs and digital business owners.

If you want to know more you want to learn more, you want to be in a connected network of soulful heart centered female entrepreneurs to help guide and support you in your journey, and sometimes you still understand what it is that you’re going through whilst you’re building your empire, then you are in the right place. To listen to this podcast visit our channel on Apple or Spotify and remember to subscribe for future release updates!

Dawn Baxter 

Hi Pretties and welcome to this episode of our amazing podcast. Today, I am absolutely delighted to invite my wonderful friend, and world changing entrepreneur, Louise Westra to the podcast, I want to say stage, it’s not a stage, where we’re sat across from each other on computers wearing headphones, but it feels like a stage.  My lovely friend Louise not only is she changing the world, one empowered woman at a time, she’s also a bestselling author, speaker, and just all round, rad female. So, I’ll pass it over to you to give a better introduction than mine. But welcome to our podcast.

 

Louise Westra 

Thank you, darling, I love your introduction, thank you so much for having me. My work is really about ensuring that women stopped paying the price of their success, whether that’s with their own business, whether that’s, you know, in a paid role, and to ensure that they’re not only paying not only not paying the price of their success with their health and wellbeing, but they’re actively involved in creating a life that allows them to flourish physically, mentally, emotionally, and, you know, biologically down in ourselves, which is where the magic really happens.

 

Dawn Baxter 

And that, I think, for me meeting you is probably the first introduction to even considering my body on that level, I don’t think I ever once for one second considered all the needs that that I have as a human just as a being not as a performing athlete or not, you know, because you have this idea in your mind in terms of fitness, right?  And fitness is this kind of high level athletic, almost unobtainable for some of us this ideal, and you really opened up my mind to the idea that actually no the magnificent functioning human being body as it is on a daily basis still has some requirements that need to be met beyond a little bit of sleep and the odd shower.

 

Louise Westra 

And the odd glass of water, and an occasional bar of chocolate. But you know, I’m all about the occasional bar of chocolate anyway. So I just actually already want to pick up on something that you’ve said about performance, because obviously, my work is very much based around improving performance. But I like to go deeper than that because, you know, this idea that everything we have to do, or should be doing as female business owners is about improving our performance, whether that’s, you know, our, our physical performance, being able to, you know, work for longer, go harder, scale, all those kinds of things. And I’m not saying that people shouldn’t do those things, but there’s also this underlying piece that I think is neglected, which is around, sometimes we need to just do things for us, that have nothing to do with being able to perform better, that really is just about this piece around me being worthwhile because I am here.  As opposed to, I’m worthwhile because I’m earning a certain amount of money or it’s important for me to do this piece of professional development because it will translate into more money and that’s not to say that those things shouldn’t be part of the conversation. But there is such a lot missing for so many female entrepreneurs around taking care of themselves. We are, as you know, very much encouraged to do a lot of work around mindset. And again, I actively encourage that. We’ve got very good friends in common who that’s their zone of genius. And I’m all for it at the same time if we create a mindset that that is allowing us to move forward and let go of things like imposter syndrome and so on and become more visible and create more success. If we also leave our physical bodies behind, then we are going to at some stage come unstuck. If we are also not addressing pieces around our self-worth, and our meaning and purpose, our true meaning and purpose, and what that looks like in the context of our business, then we will often find ourselves driving and pushing harder and harder and harder without really unpacking, why are we doing this in the first place? And I think it’s really important for me and the women that I work with, to start to unravel the piece around. Why is it so important for me to succeed in this way? Like, why? You know, and I’m not suggesting again, that, that we shouldn’t have financial success, but just making sure that that pursuit of financial success isn’t coming from a place of lack of self-worth. And, manifesting that in a real world situation whereby the more I, the more visible I become, the more I feel better about myself, because that’s not a sustainable way of being in the world. And I say that, as someone who’s been doing this work for 20 years. 

 

Dawn Baxter 

And the thing is, is you have that great understanding, because the women that you work with, and that you actually have that great relationship with, when you’re expanding our minds in terms of all of these narratives that we’ve previously, either we have consciously neglected them, or we have been unaware of them in a way that we’ve never explored them for ourselves before. Because I always think it’s crazy when we talk to our friends out the people that are in our network that we speak to, and they will discuss these things and levels of their partner, they’ll discuss it on levels of their children, of their parents, of their close family members and even their friends and not look inwardly as to whether they are taking care of themselves for themselves. So I mean, what I love about that, is that the things that people come to you for support with that there are some commonalities, aren’t there in terms of what we actually need to be looking at that we’re not, we’re all special, but we’re not special in that way that actually, we’re not doing a great job generally, across the board, when it comes to taking care of ourselves in this way.

 

Louise Westra 

Yeah, absolutely. And there’s so much incongruency between what people are saying they’re doing and then how they’re acting behind the scenes. And I don’t mean that they’re doing it in a malevolent way, but they’re just not joining the dots. So you know, even in the last few days, I had a conversation with someone who, you know, is currently doing something like eight qualifications. Eight different qualifications in the next year has, you know, and I was I was, well, you can tell I was, I was dumbfounded, because I just would have never expected this person to have put themselves in that position. So, you know, as I say, the incongruency is there, and its women just don’t seem to really join the dots, unless or until they get to a point where it’s so blatantly obvious that almost they’ve done it to themselves. And I don’t mean that in a shame, you know, in a way of shaming anyone, but it’s just about, you know, unless we stop and acknowledge the role that we play in these things, it’s very difficult for them to change. And, you know, as you’ve said, there are a number of commonalities. Every one is unique. Absolutely. But there are a number of common themes that I’ve seen over 20 years of doing this work. And having also burned out myself in my late 20s, mid to late 20s. I’ve got a pretty good grasp on what’s going on. So one of the big things that that I see, time and time again, is what I call a hangover from the post industrial revolution. So if you do a quick history lesson, bear with, prior to the Industrial Revolution, the average kind of person, you know who most of us were peasants worked between six and eight hours a day, six days a week right?  In the fields, basically, making sure that there was enough food for us and our families. That was the focus. And granted through the summer months where the days are longer, there’s more light we would have been working for probably longer days. But by and large, we worked overall about 150 days a year, because we had a lot of festivals and events that were built into our annual calendar. So that’s the 14th century, roughly mid-14th century, then if you fast forward to the mid-19th century by which most of us who were peasants have been funnelled into, essentially, some type of factory, the unfettered brutality that went on at that time for a significant period, which resulted in a lot of death, injury, and just this callous use of human labour, because there was no regulations meant that people were then working about 311 days a year. So, if you fast forward to the end of the 20th, obviously, we’re in the beginning of the 21st century, everything that we now know, as far as work life balance goes, is still judged against that time in our history. So we’ve got a situation now where, you know, if you as a woman, and obviously, I’m talking to our audience, if you as a woman, find that you put productivity before the needs of your body, if you still have this enduring belief that your work creates happiness, if you feel lazy, if you’re not doing it all, even if you are, you know, not well, traumatised, suffering some adversities. If you have a self worth, that’s based on external success, and you feel guilty for resting, then you have what I call a post industrial hangover. And that’s something that that needs to be shifted, I would suggest as one of the places to really start.

 

Dawn Baxter 

And we wear that as a badge of honour, don’t we, the high performance thing that I mean, I love that term, that high performance thing that you’re talking about, in terms of actually creating better performance for you in terms of your, your actual health is not actually how we use that term, we use that term, high performance for somebody who wears it almost like a badge of honour, in terms of they will go and go and go and be productive, even at the detriment of their own self.

 

Louise Westra 

Yeah, exactly that, you know, we wear, well, as you said, we were our busyness as a misplaced badge of worthiness is what it comes to look at me, I’m so busy, I’m so important, you know, when in actual fact, you don’t have to be the queen of all the things of all the doing. And, and in order to be worthwhile the fact that you are here, as a human being having a unique experience that’s what we need to work towards as being enough that just by being here, by being a present, sentient human being, that’s where my inherent value is. 

 

Dawn Baxter

Born worthy.

 

Louise Westra

And that is, you know, that’s missing in the bulk of the women.  Born worthy exactly. And, you know, talking about that one of the, again, one of the other enduring themes is a lack of a lack of self-worth, or lack of self-worth, and self-love that I see in women time and time again, that means that everyone else’s needs are more important than their own.

 

Dawn Baxter 

I can understand that.  I’ve actually been that way myself.

 

Louise Westra 

I think it’s very, very common, I think from the perspective or from my perspective, and if we want to get deeper into it from the perspective of the patriarchy, it’s, it’s in society’s interest, or certainly, if you’re talking about the minority, which is, you know, a white male experience. It’s in their interests, and it’s in the interest of the systems and the structures that we have in place for women to continue to be a little bit beaten down, because then they won’t rise up and ask for an equitable reorganisation and a more equitable foundation to those systems and structures and institutions and so on.

 

Dawn Baxter 

Yeah. I love the idea that we are coming into a different season as women and actually taking a look at these themes and these narratives and changing our own perception, for the greater good of us all collectively together, I think it’s a really interesting conversation. And I’m really glad – it’s gonna sound a bit weird – but I’m just so glad that I was alive for this change in conversation and change in relationship structure when it comes to really educating ourselves on all areas in which we’ve previously, maybe we’ve known it, maybe we’ve allowed it, but maybe actually, some of us I know, it’s generational. For me, it feels like you were born into this culture and we accepted a certain way of living. Because it was it was gospel, it was given it was what we knew and what we were told, how things were, I love the fact that that’s being challenged. I love being around people like you, Louise, who challenge those ideas and disrupt the whole patriarchal structure that I think that we have now come to the point where we’re looking at that, and we really want to break that down.

 

Louise Westra 

Yeah, and I think, you know, what, you’re what you’re saying, essentially, Dawnie is, it’s dogma, you know, we’re born, we accept certain ways of being, certain beliefs as dogma. And my work is very much around encouraging women to become more curious about not accepting the dogma of, well, you know, what is a woman supposed to be doing? You know, that, that she can have it all, but ultimately, you know, you can expect it to be to your detriment, if you do want to have all that we accept what success.  One of the things I work a lot on is what success really, really looks like for female business owners, because I would say 99.9% of them, certainly the ones that  I’m working with, who usually have some kind of health challenge, of course, haven’t even got themselves factored in to their plan for success in the most basic way. So that’s not to say that they don’t have a plan for themselves in terms of, where they want to live, the holidays they want to take, the things they – the way that they want to be in some ways, but they haven’t actually even planned for the basic needs of their body. And that, the fundamental biological needs, which is always going to undermine the ability to not necessarily succeed in the way you want to, but you are going to pay a price with your health and wellbeing, even if you don’t realise it along the way. And one of the reasons I think that women don’t realise what is happening is that again, within the framework, within the dogma of the medical system we’ve got, we’re, again, not encouraged to really become insightful into what’s going on with our bodies. So unless or until something goes very, very wrong we’re not encouraged to really pay much attention. And that’s not to say, I’m not suggesting for a minute that we don’t have a brilliant medical system, because when it comes to acute care, emergency, trauma type situations, like take a traffic accident, for instance, that is where our medical system is absolutely brilliant, when it comes to things like reconstructive care, when it comes to taking care of premature babies. There’s so much to be thankful for within that paradigm. At the same time, what we want to be doing is having a relationship with our body so that we understand more of the subtleties. So that when we have a headache, for instance, instead of just banging down two paracetamol and keeping on keeping on, maybe we have a think about, just for a few minutes of oh gosh, actually, I can feel where my shoulders are right now. I just let me just, you know, give them a little move around. And oh, actually, I might bring forward that that regular ongoing appointment I have with my osteopath and my chiropractor, to have an adjustment or to see how well my body, my vehicle is running. Rather than waiting until, you know we’ve got almost a migraine from postural issues that arise from sitting in front of a computer for instance, that’s just a simple example. So, you know, I really want everyone to be as curious as possible, to develop a relationship with themselves because the more that we understand how we operate within stressful situations, when we are paying attention, we can say, oh, well, I would never act like this in this situation, or I would never do that. But actually, I see all the time, people saying one thing, and I genuinely believe they believe it. And yet they act in a completely different way, when the proverbial hits the fan. You know, and it’s not, it’s not that I’m looking around judging, but I’m someone who pays attention. So the more that we can build that relationship with ourselves, the more that we understand the subtleties of our experience, the more we listen to the messages from our body, because that’s what they are they are our body trying to share with us what’s going awry, or what’s not working well. And again, in the context of our business, we’re encouraged to, you know, keep testing, test and tweak, test and tweak, test and tweak, test and tweak. It’s the same thing with our bodies, you know, we are the longest relationship we’re going to have in our lives. Why don’t we apply the same principles that we apply to our business to ourselves?

 

Dawn Baxter 

Yeah.

 

Louise Westra 

I mean, I know why we don’t we’ve been discussing that. But you know I’d like to start doing that.

 

Dawn Baxter 

Absolutely, and I think what is really always so interesting, is that it’s very easy for us to talk about diagnostics in business, it’s very easy for us to talk about strategy with our companies, and what we’re going to do financial strategy, visibility strategy, but it’s like preparing you can’t make a decent meal without the preparation. I know if my husband was on this podcast. Now he would talk about how fine finish interior design doesn’t happen without first the preparation. But yet, when it comes to our bodies, you’re absolutely right, until there is a problem, until there is an ailment and often, there are ailments that we have decided that our low level ailments like a headache, like a backache, like possibly feeling a little bit fatigued all of the time, these are these kind of low level slightly under the radar things that we decide aren’t anything to worry about, aren’t anything to really focus on, when actually those are the messages that your body is telling you. There’s something here that isn’t quite right. And I know obviously, you did this amazing, was it your doctorate on gut health and you were talking to me about gut health one time, and you blew my mind about how many functions actually come back to your guts of what you can figure out just from your gut health, and, and we were having this conversation, you were talking to me about all different things. And we touched on nutritional supplements, and we touched on all sorts of different things. And I remember thinking in that moment, I know nothing about my own body. Like I know nothing about how my body actually works. And I’ve spent 1000s of pounds and hundreds of hours figuring out how my brain works, figuring out the psychological aspects of everything. And that started with business, but then it became an interest. But when it comes to the rest of your body, it’s almost like from the neck down we don’t care unless it’s aching, bleeding or falling off. We’re not interested in what’s going on there.

 

Louise Westra 

Yeah, that’s so that’s such a good point. And I think you’ve made some great, great points just then because, you know, so many people do recognise the relationship between the mind and the impact of essentially stress, that is psychological stress on our physiological experience. But what’s missing is this understanding that the way that we think, the way that we feel, the way that we behave is also driven by what’s going on in our organs and our organ systems. So a great example of this is the thyroid. You know, I work with a lot of women that have underactive thyroids, some subclinical, some diagnosed medically, and the things that fall away in terms of their thought processes, the things that improve emotionally, the choices that they make once their thyroid and often the rest of their endocrine hormonal system is working more beautifully for them to be flourishing hormonally it’s a completely different experience. But it’s understanding that, this is not a one way street, the mind doesn’t just control the body, the body also influences our experience in our minds. And then the other thing that you talked about, as well, which is essentially the acceptance of ill health, the acceptance of low grade ill health, as really all we can expect, you know, again, most women in their businesses wouldn’t just accept well, you know, this is how it’s going to be, it’s got to be rubbish, they’d be looking around and looking for solutions. But we don’t often do that for ourselves but I always say is it any wonder because when women look around, what do they see, they see other women accepting the same thing they see, essentially an epidemic of women who have some level of fatigue on a day to day basis. I mean, the figures are astounding, in Britain, the average Britain, I’d haven’t even, you know, looked more closely at the difference between male and female experience fatigue for something like seven years of their life. So it’s equivalent to like, two hours and 56 minutes a day that people are feeling tired, like 3 hours a day, essentially. But yet, if you ask a family member, or a girlfriend, or a business colleague, or a mentor, the vast majority of them are saying the same, so we just use that to validate our experience, rather than saying, well actually, I don’t accept this, I want to be flourishing, I want to feel vital.  I’m going to look for the women that are clearly not having that experience. And that’s what I say to people, like, be exceptional, be exceptional in this way. Yes, be exceptional in your business. But be exceptional, first and foremost, in the experience in your incredible body. I mean, this is a consort, that should carry us through life beautifully. And a lot of the things that people put up with and struggle with and find challenging in their physiological experience in their emotional, mental, physical experience, I would have to say with the right support, and the right understanding about yourself is avoidable.

 

Dawn Baxter 

Like, why do we just accept that this level of, and I want to say low level suffering, everybody’s obviously everybody’s situation is different. That’s not trying to dilute somebody who is in actual chronic suffering. But everybody has this kind of low level acceptance, when actually, there’s the opportunity to do something about it. You can look at yourself, you can look at the way you’re actually performing in your body. And I mean, just like in normal performance, you know, how well is your sleep? Do you get skin breakouts and things like that? Because that’s the type of thing that we notice, and we ignore aches and pains, and tiredness levels. And what my question is to you Louise, like if for somebody who’s listening today who’s thinking, oh my goodness, that’s me. I’m fatigued. Three or four hours every single day or I have a minor ailment that I just kind of live with, what is the first step because I always thought perhaps, going and getting blood tests and things like that done is a good thing to do to find things out. But obviously, I’m not the expert here. What is the first step for somebody if they’re feeling that way to figure themselves out, if you will?

 

Louise Westra 

I mean, the thing about blood tests is that they can be useful if there’s something pathological going on. You know, if there’s actually something that can be diagnosed, that could be an iron deficiency, anaemia or a pernicious anaemia, or something potentially less benign. The first thing that I would encourage people to do is to go away and think about firstly, how do they want to feel on a day to day basis, put aside the negativity bias of how I currently feel, how everyone around me feels and think about how do I actually want to feel on a day to day basis? And then become curious, start to maybe use a little bit of a journal and think about we’ve used the example of a headache, think about when that headache happens, where are you? What are you doing, what time is it happening, who are you with? And start to start to look at the trends, the patterns and see whether it is related to a particular time of the day? Is it related to being with a particular person or a particular group of people? Is it related to a particular activity? Is it related to you being in a certain space, as in it could be a position that you’re a postural position that you’re in, as I mentioned before, so that would be my first inclination is if you’re doing this on your own, start really tracking it, essentially. And working out what are the themes and the trends that are relating to that consistent experience of the ailment or the fatigue or whatever?

 

Dawn Baxter 

Yeah, that’s a great thing. Because that’s another thing what you said earlier, is something that I have previously been so guilty of, I couldn’t tell you when the last headache I had was, I just know that obviously, if I have a headache, I will have some paracetamol like you said, and if you say to me, oh, when was the last time you had a headache, what was the last time you felt a bit this way, I don’t track it. I don’t consider it, I track my cycle, I track the moon, I track many different things. But that isn’t something that I am consciously aware of. And actually just bringing that to the forefront of your consciousness so that you can evaluate the situation and give yourself that vital information that you can maybe correlate for yourself, it doesn’t take a genius to figure out if you’re hanging out with the same person every single time you get a headache, that there is probably something to do with that particular person that is bringing on that headache, right? Like it’s not rocket science to be able to figure that out. And I think one of the main things that I really enjoy whenever, because we can get a bit ranty, especially about the patriarchy. But I think it’s just so important that we remember that fundamentally, that sometimes our wellbeing is directly connected. And all of those different efforts that we put in, in terms of our skill set and our strategy and our entrepreneurial nature, there was something that you said to me Louise when we were together at the retreat a couple of weeks ago, you said something really beautiful about how the week had been so special because of the calibre of women that had been there at the retreat and the time that we’d spent together. And that really touched me because I think, as female entrepreneurs, we do give focus to a lot of dead end areas, we give focus to a lot of different things in the pursuit and the chase of what we perceived success to be, again, like you said earlier in terms of, we’re looking around at our peers for social cues as to what success should look like and what is acceptable, and what we should be allowing ourselves to endure in the pursuit of those things. Almost, you know, going into slightly, just slightly, I won’t go fully into it, but just slightly into that social hierarchy, and buying into all of that stuff, rather than actually looking at ourselves and what we truly want. We look at the business stuff. And we often say what is the purpose behind it? What is the reason? What is the meaning for it for you? But how often are we actually applying that same level of depth, that integration of thoughts when it comes into our physiological wellbeing, when it comes into our performance level, when it comes into how we feel, when it comes into our wellbeing as a whole. Because without that, we’re never going to be that best version of ourselves that we talked about all of the time, when we’re talking about yachts and champagne, and financial freedom, and working two hours yet still being a millionaire and all of those great narratives that just surround us and whirlwind around us all the time. Like what does that actually mean for you? Because for some people having optimal health, having enough financial stability to enjoy the life we’ve been blessed with, and be enabled to just truly have that area of wellbeing where we can give and be a good calibre of person in this world is the absolute epitome of success.

 

Louise Westra 

Yeah, I mean, I’m fortunate, I guess, because I’m very privileged with a lot of my clients because over the years I’ve worked with business owners that are that are going from multiple millions and looking at trajectory into billions and I remember having one particular conversation with, and actually he’s a male. He’s – even if I said his name, which obviously I would never do – people wouldn’t know who he is. Because he is like most of my clients very low key. Not even on Facebook, Instagram not on social media. And I remember having a conversation with him at the time was quite a number of years ago, now, I was very nervous about having this conversation with him. But finally, I just said to him, we’ve had a couple of sessions. And I just thought, I think I’m the only person in his life that’s going to say this to him. And I said to him, so when is enough going be enough then? And actually, at the time, he was kind of like, well, when I’ve done this, and blah, and this, that, and the other and blah, blah, blah, blah. And he went away. And he thought about it. And the next session, I saw him about a month later, he came back, and he said, you’re the only person that’s ever said that to me. I said yes I know, but you know, I had to get over myself to do it. Because you, you needed to go away and ask yourself that, because  we’ve been working together for a little while at that time, and it had taken a while for him to really let go and share certain aspects of his life with me. And it really made him think about whether or not he wanted to take his business from the multi, multi millions, into the billionaire stratosphere. And he eventually decided against it, because he knew what it was going to take. And he also  knew that it really didn’t fit what it was going to offer him and his family, in terms of additional financial success, it was going to cost them a lot more in terms of, he’d be less able to fly under the radar, he’d have to be more aware of things like security with his children, and all sorts of broader things, that it really, I really gave him that opportunity to think about it, because I stopped him in his tracks. And had he wanted to carry on and do that, well, then that that would have been totally his prerogative. But giving people the opportunity in the space to really stop and think about what is it all about? Really, what is it all about when you, when we get past all the trappings and all the stuff? My ultimate, I guess, purpose is what kind of a human being, are we? Are we, and are the choices that we’re making for ourselves and for the people around us, are those having a net benefit, or a net adverse impact on the world, and I, as trite as it may sound, and you know me, I’m definitely not, I’m not suggesting for a minute that I’m flawless at it, but my work is really ultimately about how am I humaning? And if you are having a, if you are having an experience emotionally, mentally, physically and biologically, that is, at the vibrant, flourishing level, then in my experience, and my opinion, you are much better positioned to be able to then have a knock on net positive benefit to the humans around you and beyond.

 

Dawn Baxter 

And I think that’s such a beautiful way to look at our whole idea of what it is that we’re doing here. Like, I spoke to one of our friends, one of the Pretty Pro members, I won’t mention her by name, but spoke to her once and she was like, oh, yeah, that’s in my 20 year plan. And I remember thinking damn 20 year plan is a long term plan. And but I always tell people, when they’re looking at their businesses, to be looking at their bird’s eye view, to be looking at the bigger picture, what is this, what is what you’re doing today, creating for you tomorrow? Like, what is it you’re actually doing with that footstep, with that seed you’re planting? What is it that you’re moving that traction towards? And yet when you apply that to your own wellbeing, when you apply that to your own level of success when is enough enough? At what point through your history, your lifespan are you going to be comfortable to say, okay, now it’s time for me to sit in a hammock in Malibu with a fruit juice in the sunshine and read a book rather than striving for another million dollars, or whatever it is that you’re putting on yourself in terms of your growth and your wants and needs. And you know, so many people that I speak to, they do not see the general markers of success to be the main markers of success, we all have different things. So, if we were going to leave our listeners with one thing to consider from today’s podcast, I guess it would be to really start listening to the messages within your body and think about your long term wellbeing because at the end of the day you might want to live an extra 20 or 30 years, than the general life expectancy, but you don’t want to live those years ailed.  There’s no point in the additional life that you want to add on to this fantastic experience that we are all having here.

 

Thank you so, so much for joining me today. And to everybody listening. Thank you so much for putting yourself first I’m using Louise terminology now, and listening to this podcast, giving yourself the time to actually enrich your day with these thoughts and ideas and I hope that we will see you again, check out the description notes for all of the valuable info and where you can find Louise to go and follow her. Until next time Pretties I’ll see you then.

 

If you’re loving our Pretty podcast, come on over to social pretties our online safe house and sisterhood community is a safe space where female entrepreneurs connect and thrive in a warm welcoming fold of pretty amazing women. You’ll find an easy redirect in the description and I can’t wait to see you in there.  And depending on where you’re listening right now we would love it if you would click subscribe or follow so that you can be the first to know when our new podcasts come out.

 

Naturopath, Best-selling Author of “You FIRST” joins Dawn to talk about Female health and wellbeing and the importance for us to understand we are born worthy.

Louises book link : https://www.amazon.co.uk/You-First-Your-Needs-Guilt/dp/1913728439/

 

About Louise:

Louise Westra is on a mission to ensure women STOP neglecting themselves. She is one of the few Naturopaths in the UK with a Master’s degree in Science so the good news is that I’ve read all the scientific papers so you don’t have to!

 

That means you get all the good stuff, the practical solutions for your  daily life so YOU can  STOP using all the same excuses to feel like crap and start to embrace each day just the way you deserve. Louise’s debut book ‘You First’ is available to buy now.

 

Website: https://www.louisewestra.com/

 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/louisewestrahealthmastery

I hope you enjoyed today’s podcast as much as I enjoyed recording it! Make sure to subscribe on your favourite podcast provider for future release updates

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